Bridging the Opportunity Divide

How Does This Sheet Make Healthy Food More Accessible?

November 27, 2014
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How Does This Sheet Make Healthy Food More Accessible?
The Seedsheet is pre-loaded with seed and only needs watering. Cloudfarm via Kickstarter
Added bonus: It reduces water usage and soil erosion.

Let’s be honest, most of us probably love the taste of homegrown, fresh vegetables, but we don’t want to do the work required to start our own garden. Between weeding, planting and watering, the upkeep of a garden requires a lot of time that many of us simply don’t have.

All of that might change, however, with the invention of the Seedsheet, a seed-loaded sheet customized to your needs.

Seedsheet is the product of the new Vermont-based company Cloudform. A Kickstarter campaign to fund its production launched on Nov. 14.

Green thumbs can design their garden using the Seedsheet’s website, and according to CEO and founder Cameron MacKulger, it’s as simple as paint by numbers. Users plug in their garden dimensions on the website and and their zip code to learn which plant hardiness zone they live in. Next, users customize garden by dragging, dropping and arranging fruits, vegetables and herbs in their virtual garden.

Seedsheet will then create the sheet and all the customer has to do is prepare the soil, put the sheet in the soil and water. The sheet eliminates the need for seed selection, planting and weeding (thanks to the weed-barrier fabric in it).

Making gardening easier is not MacKugler’s ultimate goal, however.

“The primary aim of the Seedsheet, and our company, is to make healthy food accessible for everyone,” MacKugler tells Motherboard. “The Seedsheet is a value-add to people that already garden, as it is an innovation that will save time and improve upon the process that they already love. By incorporating a user-friendly software program, we make gardening approachable to millennials that would otherwise be intimidated by a 100-page seed catalog.”

Additionally, because Seedsheet warms the ground beneath it, it makes the soil and seeds more stable to fight erosion, plus, it requires less watering.

Sounds like a dream come true for green thumbs everywhere.

MORE: From Farm to Patient: How One Medical Facility is Rethinking Hospital Food

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