Utah teen with terminal cancer gets a hero's welcome back home.

This Dying Girl's 'Make-a-Wish' Was to Help Her Community

A brave and selfless 13-year-old girl made an incredible gesture to her high school.

Jayci Glover, a 13-year-old from Kanab, Utah, is trying to live the best life she can. The teenager, who has a rare form of terminal lymphoma, was granted a wish from the Make-A-Wish Foundation. But as Yahoo News reports, the girl with the big heart didn’t want a trip to Disneyland or the chance to meet a celebrity. Instead, Jayci asked the foundation to make a donation to her high school.

Thanks to Jayci, Kanab High School was presented with a check for $7,500 that will go towards a new scoreboard for the gym. According to the report, the boys basketball team wore shirts that read “Fight Like Jayci” and each boy gave her a rose and a hug or kiss for her generosity.

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As you can see in the touching video from KSL above, earlier this month Jayci was given a hero’s welcome after leaving the hospital in Salt Lake City. Hundreds of people lined up with posters and cheered for the brave girl, who has endured countless rounds of chemotherapy and radiation. Doctors feared that she wouldn’t survive the five hour drive back to her home town but she’s now comfortably resting and spending time with friends and family.

Jayci’s mother, Heather, recently wrote on the family’s fundraising site that while the disease has been taking over her daughter’s body at a rapid pace, Jayci has remained positive and strong. “She never let cancer into her spirit. Jayci has cancer, cancer does not now and never will have Jayci,” she wrote. “We are the luckiest parents in the world to get to call her our daughter. She has taught us so much and we are so proud of her.” This generous girl can teach the rest of us all a little something, too.

Source: Yahoo News

Lorraine Chow is a freelance writer and reporter from Los Angeles, California. She previously worked for the New York Post's Page Six.