Advancing National Service

How Paper Airplanes Paid for a Veteran’s Trip to Washington, D.C.

January 5, 2015
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How Paper Airplanes Paid for a Veteran’s Trip to Washington, D.C.
Members of a military veteran group pose for a group picture as they visit the World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C., Oct. 2, 2013. A 7-year-old Indiana boy is raising funds to help more veterans visit the site. Alex Wong/Getty Images
This 7-year-old turned paper folding into a successful fundraiser.

While learning about D-Day in his homeschool lessons, Jagger, a 7-year-old from Hamilton, Ind., was struck by the soldiers’ bravery. Inspired, Jagger wanted to do something to honor a World War II veteran.

So he came up with the idea of raising $800 — enough to send one veteran on a trip to Washington, D.C. through Northeast Indiana Honor Flight, a nonprofit that has four flights scheduled for 2015 to bring groups of veterans to see the World War II memorial.

“He loves folding paper airplanes and with it being the honor flight we thought that would be a really neat thing that he could give back to the people who are helping him reach his goal,” Jagger’s mother Chante Hurraw tells WANE-TV.

So Jagger began folding airplanes and built a display explaining his project. He took it and his paper-airplane-folding prowess to several dinners at American Legions and told the attendees that if they made a donation, he’d give them an airplane.

Jagger ended up raising $1,058.25, enough to send one veteran to our nation’s capital, plus extra to start saving up for a second veteran’s trip. Jagger plans to keep up his fundraising and paper airplane mission indefinitely.

“We couldn’t be prouder,” his mom says. “He’s a great person. He’s a great kid, but he is a great person. He has a big heart. That’s important to us.”

 MORE: When This Veteran Needed Help Paying for His Dog’s Service Training, This Young Girl Opened A Lemonade Stand

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